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Known for the regularity and distinctness of its tapestries, the royal French tapestry factory in Paris known as the Gobelins used 15 to 18 threads per inch (6 to 7 per centimetre) in the 17th century and 18 to 20 (7 to 8) in the 18th century.Another royal factory of the French monarchy at Beauvais had as many as 25 or even 40 threads per inch (10 to 16 per centimetre) in the 19th century.

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Wholly Cotton and wool were employed for pre-Columbian Peruvian tapestries as well as for some of the tapestries made in the Islamic world during the Middle Ages.

Since the 14th century, European weavers have used gold and silver weft weaving in that no weft threads are carried the full width of the fabric web, except by an occasional accident of design.

A “room” order included not only wall hangings but also tapestry weavings to upholster furniture, cover cushions, and make bed canopies and other items.

Most Western tapestry, however, has been used as a type of movable monumental decoration for large architectural surfaces, though in the 18th century, tapestries were frequently encased in the woodwork.

In the West, tapestry traditionally has been a collective art combining the talents of the painter, or designer, with those of the weaver.

The earliest European tapestries, those woven in the Middle Ages, were made by weavers who exercised much of their own ingenuity in following the cartoon, or artist’s sketch for the design.

In Europe during the Middle Ages, the thickness of the wool tapestry fabric in such works as the 14th-century tapestry was about 10 to 12 threads to the inch (5 to the centimetre).

By the 16th century the tapestry grain had gradually become finer as tapestry more closely imitated painting.

Though he followed the painter’s directions and pattern fairly closely, the weaver did not hesitate to make departures from them and assert his own skills and artistic personality.

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